Why everyone should try dogsledding

There’s nothing like racing through the trees or over a frozen lake, bouncing over bumps as the wind breezes past your face, the sound of the dogs’ feet hitting the ground accompanied by the rustle of the trees. With the Iditarod starting on March 3rd, dogsledding has been filling my mind more than usual. Specifically, I want people to be able to experience dogsledding like myself so that they can see why I love it so much.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The most important reason people should go dogsledding is because of the dogs. Both times I went dogsledding, I formed a really close bond with the dogs there. In fact, the second time I went I was able to have two of the dogs on my team that were on my team last time. At Wintergreen Dogsled Lodge, the place I went, you get to spend a lot of time with the dogs. You can help feed them, harness them, and hook them up to the sled. Also, you can spend a lot of time interacting with them–everytime we stopped for longer than a minute I would always go up to the dogs and pet them all.

Another reason you should go dogsledding is because of all of the stuff you learn. The guides at Wintergreen explained a lot: things about the dogs, the races, the sleds and even stuff about the environment like the different types of trees. For instance, the order the dogs are hooked up isn’t random, they go in different places depending on their skills. Lead dogs are at the very front. These dogs have to have a natural instinct for leading – they have to have a good sense of direction and be able to listen well. Swing dogs are next. They also have to be good listeners as they help turn the rest of the team. Team dogs are the largest group:  these dogs make up the brunt of the force. Finally come the wheel dogs, who are the strongest. Because they are closest to the sled they feel the weight of it more than any other dog. Usually a team has dogs in two rows, with either one or two lead dogs.

One thing I really liked about Wintergreen was that you get to do a lot of the stuff by yourself; for instance, you get to stand on the sled runners and command the dogs, while in some places you only get to sit in the basket at the front of the sled.

Of course the main reason people don’t want to go dogsledding is because of the cold, and yes, it is quite cold. However, it’s easy to stay warm using three tactics: lots of layers of clothing, moving around, and eating. For clothing, you should try to wear three different layers, a wicking layer – anything that repels moisture, a warmth layer – fleece and other warm materials, and a wind layer – windbreakers and other things. Moving around stimulates blood flow and helps keep your extremities warm. Lastly, when you digest food your body generates heat, so if you’re cold eating helps a lot.

If dogsledding sounds interesting to you, you should definitely check it out. Even if you can’t go dogsledding, you can learn more about it on the official Iditarod website, iditarod.com or any other source of information about dogsledding.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Why everyone should try dogsledding

    Profiles

    Breaking the Mold

  • Why everyone should try dogsledding

    Profiles

    Life in the books

  • Why everyone should try dogsledding

    Profiles

    350.5 miles later

  • Why everyone should try dogsledding

    Profiles

    Oh the places Sanya will go

  • Why everyone should try dogsledding

    Profiles

    A world of her own

  • Why everyone should try dogsledding

    Profiles

    Ways to survive the franchise life

  • Why everyone should try dogsledding

    Profiles

    Student turns trash into treasure

  • Why everyone should try dogsledding

    Profiles

    Katya Moeller a Violinist

  • Why everyone should try dogsledding

    News

    Keeping up with the kittens

  • Why everyone should try dogsledding

    News

    Computer integrated manufacturing: a new class

Why everyone should try dogsledding